The Kyphoplasty Experts

Kyphoplasty stabilizes the interior of a damaged spinal bone (vertebra) and decrease–or eliminate–pain.

 

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What is a Kyphoplasty?

Kyphoplasty is intended to treat the damage caused by osteoporosis, spinal tumors, or injuries resulting in compression fractures. It may also help prevent further erosion of the spinal bones and/or a domino effect of compression fractures, as well as the pain that erosion would induce.

Kyphoplasty Procedure Essentials

Patient Satisfaction. Very High

Does It Require an Overnight Stay? Sometimes. It depends on a few factors

Incision Size. Less than an inch

Recovery Details. Walking the day of the surgery, back to work or play in a couple weeks to a couple months

Physicians Who Perform Kyphoplasty

North American Spine partner physicians are board-certified, minimally invasive specialists in Kyphoplasty and other related procedures. They are among the best in the field, and many have served as teachers of the next generation of minimally invasive specialists.

 

Unlike at most practices, North American Spine partner physicians may collaborate on a complex procedure to ensure that all the required skill and knowledge is brought to the case. But perhaps the most telling fact of all is this: 97% of patients say they would recommend their doctor to a friend.

 

 

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Answering a few questions will kickstart the process. Let's get you free of pain.

Benefits of the Kyphoplasty

Kyphoplasty is related to a procedure called “vertebroplasty” and may be considered one treatment within the larger category of “vertebral augmentation.” It is intended to treat the damage caused by osteoporosis, spinal tumors, or injuries resulting in compression fractures. It may also help prevent further erosion of the spinal bones and/or a domino effect of compression fractures, as well as the pain that erosion would induce. Because osteoporosis and compression fractures often result in decreased spinal height, many patients note that most or all of their pre-kyphoplasty height is regained after the procedure. Finally, the minimally invasive nature of the procedure results in decreased healing times, blood loss, and risk of infection compared to traditional, open surgeries.

Details of the Kyphoplasty

Before performing a kyphoplasty, your surgeon will confirm the presence of a compression fracture with the help of an MRI or CT scan. He or she will first use additional imaging information from a C-arm fluoroscope to create a pathway through your skin to the targeted bone.

 

When performing a kyphoplasty, your surgeon will first pass a small, deflated balloon into the interior of the damaged bone, then form an opening in the middle of the bone by inflating the balloon. This process effectively pushes the bone fragments together and restores structural integrity. Once the opening in the bone is formed, your surgeon will deflate and remove the balloon, then inject the opening with a type of medical-grade cement. When this cement dries, it stabilizes the fragmented pieces of the bone and holds them in place permanently. Local anesthesia or light sedation will be administered. The injection–which is typically not painful–takes 15-30 minutes.

Preparing for the Kyphoplasty

 

Before pursuing a kyphoplasty, prospective patients should have tried conservative methods, such as physical therapy, chiropractic, and spinal injections. If those methods have not produced meaningful relief, you may be a candidate for a North American Spine procedure.

Kyphoplasty Recovery

Most patients will be able to return to work or play the very next day, though the injection site may have some dull soreness, which will fade away in days. While every medical procedure carries some risk of injury or infection, complications and adverse events are very rare. Your physician will counsel you on these risks prior to the procedure.