Pinched Nerves Treatments

While some people with a pinched nerve recover via conservative methods (like pain relievers or chiropractic care), others will need minimally invasive surgery to free the nerve that is causing the pain.

Get Relief

Rest

More often than not, the first course of action recommended will be to rest the area of your body affected by your irritated nerve. If you have a job that requires the repeated use of an affected area, you may need to temporarily suspend your activities or use a physical support that limits your risks. For example, people with carpal tunnel syndrome sometimes wear wrist braces in order to avoid pinching the damaged nerve responsible for their symptoms. You may also need to suspend participation in sports or other leisure activities that trigger or worsen the pinched nerve.

Medication

Depending on the severity of your symptoms, a doctor may recommend nonprescription or prescription medications as a pinched nerve treatment. Nonprescription options typically involve the use of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Prescription options include stronger NSAIDs, muscle relaxers, oral doses of anti-inflammatories called corticosteroids, local corticosteroid injections, numbing injections called epidurals and oral opioid painkillers.

Physical Therapy

Physical therapy can improve the symptoms of a pinched nerve by easing the amount of pressure placed on the irritated nerve. Therapists sometimes achieve this goal with strength training exercises and/or stretching exercises. They can also teach you a customized set of activity modifications that will help you keep pressure off your affected nerve.

Pinched Nerve Surgery

Doctors typically only recommend surgery when symptoms linger for prolonged periods of time, and don’t respond to multiple nonsurgical pinched nerve treatment options. The type of surgery you receive will vary according to factors that include the location of your irritated nerve and the underlying cause of your symptoms. As a rule, minimally invasive surgery is preferable since it produces less collateral damage and requires less time for post-surgical recovery.

North American Spine’s family of outpatient surgical techniques is particularly well-suited to many individuals since it produces even fewer complications than other minimally invasive options. A standard form of this procedure is available for pinched nerve treatment in your lumbar spine (lower back). A second form, a Cervical Procedure, can correct problems in your neck without need for a surgical incision or additional follow-up procedures like a spinal fusion.

How are Pinched Nerves Treated?

Pinched Nerves treatment depends on you – your specific physiology and how advanced your case is. The North American Spine medical team and your physician will thoroughly evaluate your situation and recommend a treatment plan to provide both maximum relief and minimum recovery time. Treatment plants are grouped into three categories:

 

Non-surgical
Decompression
Fusion or Stabilization